Unnaming

A student brought a short story to my attention the other day, and sent me a link to it today (thanks, K!). “She Unnames Them” was written by Ursula K. LeGuin, first published in The New Yorker magazine in 1985.

I first encountered her books in the 1970s, and during my late teens and early 20s I read everything I could find of her writing, and learned a great many worthwhile things from doing so. She continues to write prolifically and it seems I have many more things to read now.

“She Unnames Them” has a lot of relevance to our practice. I found a Google Doc of it online and have made this PDF link for you to read, if you wish.

Distracting Thoughts

sodo“All you have to do is decide that wherever you are is the best place there is. Once you start comparing one place to another, there’s no end to it.” — Sodo Yokoyama

The late Zen teacher Sodo Yokoyama gave a clear summary of his teaching in a letter to a friend in 1977. This is taken from longer excerpt in the excellent book, Living and Dying in Zazen by Arthur Braverman, which I recommend with enthusiasm. “Zazen” means “just sitting”, and is a Zen word for meditation. “Satori” means a sudden flash of awareness or awakeness; a brief experience of Enlightenment.

“My teacher, the late Sawaki Roshi, often made the following self-evaluation: ‘I am an eternally deluded person. No one is as deluded as I am. I am deluded with gold trimmings. How clear it is to me when I do zazen!’

“What a strange thing this zazen is. When we practice it, distracting ideas, irrelevant thoughts — in short, delusions, which ordinary people are made of, suddenly seem to feel an irresistible temptation to arise and appear on the surface. Then there is a desire to drive these thoughts away, in irresistible desire to which our complete effort is added. Those who don’t do zazen know nothing about this. Why is it that when we practice, deluded thoughts continue to surface one after the other? The reason, which we learn from Zazen, is that each one of us, from prince to beggar, is an ordinary (deluded) person. The attempt to drive these deluded thoughts away — delusion being so much nonsense (interfering with the happiness of oneself and others) — is also something brought home to us through zazen. We tentatively call this zazen that guides us in this way, ‘Buddha’.

“According to this teaching, simply the awareness that you are deluded, which comes from practising zazen, makes you, in reality, a Buddha. It’s zazen that teaches us that we too are deluded, and hence delivers us from this delusion. When we actually practice zazen and look carefully at all the deluded ideas that keep popping up, we realize how ordinary we are and how little we have to be proud of or to brag about; nothing to do other than quietly hide away. This is, after all, what we truly are.

“Satori is being enlightened to the fact that we are deluded. There is then the desire, however small, to stop these deluded acts. That is how ordinary people are saved by zazen. So we realize, beyond a doubt, our ordinariness through our zazen practice, and any departure from zazen (Buddha) will give rise to the inability to deal with these delusions and hence we will lose our way. We can say that the world has gone astray because it can’t deal with its delusions…All the troubles in this world, political, economic and so forth, are created from situations in which the awareness of one’s ordinariness is absent.

“Sawaki Roshi said, ‘Those who are unaware of their ordinariness are from a religious point of view shallow and comical.’

“The devil — that is, illusion — when seen as the devil, can no longer exhibit its powers, and disappears of its own accord.

“Shakyamuni was enlightened beyond all doubt to the fact that he was an ordinary person and became a Buddha. Then he began to live the life of a Buddha. When you realize your ordinariness, you are a Buddha, and when you are a Buddha, no matter how many distracting ideas and irrelevant thoughts appear they are no match for a Buddha and hence no longer remain obstacles. Delusions that no longer obstruct us are called fantasies. The Buddha way — the way of peace — is turning of delusion into fantasies.” — Sodo Yokoyama 1907-1980

Worst Reasons to Meditate

I just received a promotional mailing from a meditation course that included a cut-and-paste of an article on the benefits of meditation. Eight of the ten “reasons to meditate” cited directly conflicted with my own experience. The article’s called “Top Reasons to Meditate”, and begins thus:

Meditation is a unique form of art wherein an individual learns to focus and concentration levels. Most people consider meditation as the best method to transform one’s personality or change one self into a good human.

Aside from the muddled writing, the second sentence feeds right into a huge issue: the perception that meditation is going to “fix” you or somehow change you into something “good”. It is not. I know lots of meditators who’ve been practising for years and they’re still jerks.

— Enhance intelligence
According to a serious research conducted, it has been proved that people who meditate possess thicker gray matter as compared to those who don’t. This contributes to the intelligence of a person.

This first reason

The second reason given is:

— Happiness guaranteed
In a study, various MRI Scans were conducted on people who meditated for a long time. The results showed that these people possess enhanced activity in the left prefrontal coretex. They also displayed suppressed activity in the right prefrontal coretex. This is a state closely associated with enhanced positive emotions. This ultimately proves that people who mediate are happier.

Happiness guaranteed?? There is no guarantee of anything. Nothing. Guarantees do not exist in real life. And who is to say that the relationship between happy brain activity and meditation is causal?

— Personal Insight
Another benefit of getting deep into meditation includes an enhanced level of personal insight. You would be able to see your true self. This will be extremely beneficial for you when it comes to transforming your personality into someone who you actually are.

Problem is, that “true self” you’re going to be able to see doesn’t exist. But wait a minute… I’m going to use this to transform my personality into someone I actually am? Who was it before, and where will they go after the transformation?

— Solve Problems
With mediation it is possible for you to calm down during first few sessions. Novices usually think about the problems they face in their daily life. However, when the mind relaxes, one is able to find out solutions for even the most complicated problems that exist in his or her life.

When you start out you’ll do it wrong, but hey, your lousy efforts will still bring you benefits.

— Recover Lost Memories
When you start learning to meditate, it may take some time for your mind to calm down and adjust to the new activity. One can easily give into distractions when meditating. However, you would feel that during the initial period of adjustment, you would come to know about several long-lost memories.

Oh, GOODY. This will be better than TV.

— Minimize stress levels
According to a research performed at the University Of Massachusetts Medical School and research conducted by experts, meditation is capable of transforming brain waves in the autonomic nervous system and amygdala. This provides total control to an individual over fear and stress. Several other studies conducted in this respect have proved that people who spend quality time in meditating are calmer and more relaxed as compared to those who don’t.

TOTAL CONTROL??? If I have learned anything a tall from dharma practice, it is that there is NO SUCH THING as “total control” over anything. Not one tiny little thing, not even the next thought I will think.

— Minimize pain
Several studies have shown that meditation plays a great role in controlling chronic pain. Most of the hospitals use meditation as an integral part of program in order to help patients who have chronic pain.

See my previous comments on “control”. And what got us into this mess is the constant attempts to minimize pain. This is a classic example of “mind killing” — using a person’s delusions (the delusion that one can somehow assume control and avoid or minimize paid) in order to convince them to do what you want.

— Enlightenment
The traditional Buddhist meditation will ultimately allow you to reach the stage of enlightenment.

There is nowhere to go. Nothing to attain. Enlightenment, as so beautifully put by Te Shan, is “a post to tether donkeys”.